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What is the Difference Between a Trust and a Special Needs Trust?

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By Fate Kersey
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What is the difference between a trust and a special needs trust

What is the main difference between a traditional trust and a special needs one? Essentially, a special needs trust is a trust that is made up exclusively for the benefit of a person with special needs. The assets of such a trust are managed by a trustee, who is usually someone with a certain amount of expertise in the field. They should have knowledge of how to manage investments, keep accounts, and prepare tax returns. A trustee for a special needs trust may be someone the beneficiary knows personally, but it is still a good idea to have a professional trustee, especially if the trust is for a child with a complex medical history.

A special needs trust is designed to support the beneficiary with money that is not covered by government programs. It can be used for other expenses as well, including travel expenses, clothing, and even dental work that is not covered by the government. It is important to note that the beneficiary of a special needs trust must follow IRS guidelines when using funds from the trust. The beneficiary should also keep spreadsheets and receipts, so they can account for each dollar spent in a year.

Another key difference between a special needs trust and a normal trust is that a special needs trust allows the trustee to make payments for the benefit of the beneficiary, but not to the parents. If this trust has an equity clause, the trustee can make payments that will disqualify the beneficiary from government benefits. For example, the beneficiary could use the money in the trust to purchase a house, reducing their SSI stipend. A special needs trust is a good option for this type of situation, as long as the beneficiary has housing needs that exceed those of government benefits.

Discretionary Trusts. Special needs trusts are a form of estate planning. The trustee can distribute cash or property to the beneficiary if they choose. The money that comes from such a trust is not counted against the beneficiary when government benefits are being calculated. So a trust that is irrevocable is better for estate planning than a revocable one.

The main difference between a trust and a special-needs trust is the type of funds that can be used for the beneficiaries’ healthcare. A special needs trust should have the ability to pay for private health insurance and supplemental therapies. Often, these funds are not available in government programs, but the trustee should have the authority to do this. The Special Needs Trust also allows the healthy spouse to transfer funds to the SNT during probate process.

A special needs trust is a legal arrangement and fiduciary relationship that provides funds for a disabled person’s special needs. A special needs trust will not affect a disabled person’s eligibility for government benefits, such as Supplemental Security Income. Additionally, a special needs trust does not affect the beneficiary’s ability to receive benefits from other government programs. It is a popular way to provide financial support for a disabled person, and it does not limit the amount of money available to the beneficiary.

A special needs trust can be used for the same reasons as a standard trust. For example, it can be used to receive child support payments and shield them from government aid eligibility. It can also be used to build up assets for a disabled child. If you’ve set up a special needs trust, you’re likely to be obligated to use it. This is an excellent way to protect your child from the potential of a spendthrift beneficiary.

Generally, a third-party SNT is used to pay back Medicaid if you are a disabled person. A third-party SNT, however, is funded with assets from a person other than the beneficiary. The third-party SNT is funded by a relative. If you have a disability or want to make it easier for your disabled loved one to receive the funds, a first-party SNT may be the best option.

A third-party special needs trust is a third-party special needs trust that is created out of a parent’s Revocable Trust. A trustee manages it and provides funds only for things that Medicaid does not cover. This type of special needs trust is often called a testamentary SNT. The child will benefit from the money, as long as it is not covered by Medicaid.

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