Search
Search
Main News

4 Types of Trusts

Date:
By Fate Kersey
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

What are the 4 types of trust

Revocable

If you are looking for a way to pass your assets on to your loved ones without the burden of estate taxes, a revocable trust may be the answer for you. A revocable trust is an arrangement in which the owner of the assets, called the “grantor,” has complete control over the management and distribution of the trust’s assets. The grantor can amend the trust’s terms at any time.

Although a revocable trust can provide some of the same benefits as a will, it can also have a number of disadvantages. Specifically, a revocable trust can make it harder for you to access long-term care assistance after your death. Moreover, it can be expensive and time-consuming. Additionally, you can end up paying more money to set up a revocable trust than to create a will.

There are a few different types of revocable trusts. One of the most common is the credit shelter trust, which provides creditor protection. Another type is the charitable trust, which is set up to benefit a nonprofit organization.

When you create a revocable trust, you can choose a trustee, who is in charge of managing the assets in the trust. Generally, the grantor will be the trustee, but the beneficiaries can also name a co-trustee. Ultimately, the trustee will distribute the trust’s assets to the beneficiaries after the grantor’s death. Often, a revocable trust will allow you to invest the money in the trust, but it will not provide immediate tax advantages.

Although revocable trusts are generally more flexible, you can create an irrevocable trust as well. This option is best for transferring high-value assets. In addition, an irrevocable trust provides you with greater financial security. Unlike a revocable trust, an irrevocable trust cannot be amended.

Probate is a legal process where a Last Will and Testament is admitted to a Surrogate’s court. While it can be public, it can be a very costly and time-consuming process. Also, the probate process can often delay your inheritance. To avoid probate, you should ensure that you put your property in a revocable trust if you have a number of properties in different states. You should also register the deed for the property to the revocable trust. Otherwise, the property will be passed on to the heirs through a separate probate.

Despite the advantages, a revocable trust may not be right for you. You should also consider an irrevocable trust, which is better for providing for your family members and reducing your estate tax. Lastly, you can create a revocable living trust, which is designed to give you more flexibility.

A revocable trust can be used in conjunction with a will to help you protect your assets. As the grantor of a revocable trust, you will be able to make changes to the terms of the trust and alter the name of the beneficiaries. However, you will still be responsible for paying any taxes on the trust’s property.

Revocable trusts are useful for people who own multiple properties and would like to preserve their privacy. They can also be useful for people who want to protect their assets from creditors.

Share with your friends on
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
RELATED NEWS
Main News
Date:
A seller may agree to pay for part or all of your home’s repairs if...
Main News
Date:
You are entitled to an attorney for a number of reasons, including the right to...
Main News
Date:
Why is asset protection important? It’s important for a variety of reasons, including safeguarding your...
LATEST NEWS
Real Estate
Date:
The decision to need long-term care is often fraught with emotion. Often family members have...
Featured Articles
Date:
Probate is the process of determining inheritors, collecting estate assets, paying debts and filing taxes....
Featured ArticlesMain News
Date:
The estate administration process involves gathering, settling and distributing everything a deceased person owned. A...